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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Back to main page

YesYes
Union Live
(Gonzo Multimedia)

Putting pretty much every important member to ever to serve in Yes together on the same stage (Patrick Moraz accepted) was always going to be a dangerous affair, especially given that Yes’ music is pretty much an ‘everything but the kitchen sink’ affair at the best of times, and what the hell do you do when you have both Bill Bruford and Alan White to play with (something that seems to confuse Chris Squire momentarily at the beginning of ‘Heart Of The Sunrise’)? Well the answer is occasionally way, way too much, but on the whole, given the quality of musician involved it's no surprise to learn that things rattle along in a fine old style, even if Trevor Rabins high speed shredding duel with Alan white – immediately after Steve Howe’s familiar offbeat jazzy effort - sits very uncomfortably in ‘Yours Is No Disgrace’, and it’s sometimes hard to work out what Tony Kaye is actually doing given that Rick Wakeman seems to have at least eight arms. Minor niggles however do not detract from what was/is a historical performance which no real Yes fan will want to be without, and we suggest hardcore fans head to the Gonzo site and pick up the four disc limited edition version.
Ray Harper

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YesYes
The lost Broadcasts
(Voiceprint)

Featuring the original line-up (who thankfully had decided not to stick with their first choice of name, Mabel Greer's Toyshop) with Chris Squire on bass, Tony Kaye on keyboards, Peter Banks on guitar, an impossibly young Bill Bruford on drums and, on the first songs at least, some less than confident between song rambles from singer Jon Anderson, this DVD features performances from Germany’s Beat Club TV show. The first four tracks are lifted from the first two albums - the first three recorded in 1969 in black and white - ‘Looking Around’ and ‘Survival’ from their debut Yes and the third a cover of Richie Havens ‘No Opportunity Necessary, No Experience Needed’ from Time And A Word, the title track of which turns up on track four (recorded in 1970, and now in colour) and finally we have four tracks from The Yes Album filmed in 1971 featuring a very enjoyable clatter though ‘Yours Is No Disgrace’ and three slightly different takes of ‘All Good People’ with Steve Howe replacing Peter Banks. Given the material on offer this is probably only really for dedicated fans, but long time Yes watchers will certainly be delighted with these blasts from the past.
Ray Harper

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YesYes
9012 Live
(Warner Music Vision)

Yes in their ‘80s production heavy period (featuring stalwarts Jon Anderson, Chris Squire, and Alan White with pre Rick Wakeman keyboard prodder Tony Kaye and Steve Howe replacement Trevor Rabin), but then Yes were never ones to hold onto any kitchen sinks if they could be lobbed into proceedings and consequently tracks like ‘Owner Of A lonely Heart’, whilst dripping in ‘80s production gloss still have enough convoluted time signatures and ethereal wailing to keep Yes luddites - many of whom believed Rabin and producer Trevor Horn dragged their beloved prog dinosaurs up a bland Journey and Foreigner cul-de-sac – happy. Jon Anderson is still the most uncomfortably looking front person in rock and on occasion this show does look and sound uncomfortably like the Trevor Rabin show, but the swooping 3D computer graphics, interspersed with old black and white footage ensured things footle along nicely enough, but if the truth be known the best moments are, and greatest audience responses still elicited by, classic early Yes moments like ‘Starship Trooper’, ‘I’ve Seen All Good People’ and bonus track ‘Roundabout’. Those of you not enamoured by ‘80s style computer generated jiggery-pokery also get the whole show graphically denuded, plus some access-all-areas extra footage.

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Neil YoungNeil Young
Rust Never Sleeps
(Sanctuary Midline)

Notoriously ramshackle live concert production which regardless of the barely contained pandemonium surrounding it still went on to become widely regarded as one of the best filmed live performances ever. So why is it that a film dotted with clunky interludes, huge great chunks of dead air (dead that is, aside from amplified crashing and banging), and a concept that is best described as impenetrable is held in such esteem? Simple really, Rust Never Sleeps succeeds because it’s crammed to overflowing with some of the greatest songs ever written, and performed by a singer/songwriter and band in astonishingly good form. From the opening acoustic solo section (Sugar Mountain, Comes A Time, After The Goldrush) to the thunderous Crazy Horse assisted wind up set (Powderfinger, Cortez The Killer, Cinnamon Girl, Like A Hurricane) this live show positively sizzles with passion, Young in particular excelling whether coaxing gentle fragile ballads from his acoustic guitar, piano and harmonica or wreathing songs in huge great feedback laden solos. Acts like the Talking Heads and Metallica would later play with stage production to far greater effect, but in 1978 this was as good as it got

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GreendaleNeil Young
Greendale
(Sanctuary)

Welcome to a world of badly cut and pasted newspaper mock ups, firemen that wear their helmets in the pub, artists in berets and the most tenuously linked set of songs cobbled into a storyline this side of Tommy. In brief Grandpa and Jed sit on the front porch, Jed then drives around in a car loaded with class A’s, is visited by the devil and shoots a policeman, this prompts Grandpa to lose his rag with the intrusive media and die from a heart attack. For reasons that are never made entirely clear a painter who can’t flog his paintings then takes the devil to Alaska, and Sun Green (the female heroine), try’s to wake the world up to war being a bad thing by making big signs with hay and bringing the worlds attention to ecological problems in Alaska by chaining herself to a big metal eagle in the town hall. Add to this a short lived relationship between Sun and Earth Brown (are you getting the subtext yet?) and what you have is… Well a mess frankly. However it is an engaging enough mess and some of the songs are great. Probably one for Neil Young fans only though.

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